When Rex Stout began writing the Nero Wolfe detective stories for a series of very engaging novels back in 1934, he created a character so captivating and so large in life, it was hard for people to stop reading them. Popularity grew, along with fictional character Wolfe’s waistline, and his abomination for much physical activity; save his tending of the large orchid collection he grew in the rooftop greenhouse above his 3-story Brownstone in New York. Back in 1934, Quick-Seat Chairs had not yet been invented. And nothing like them, either, save the 10” in diameter tiny rounded flip down seats one could eventually find in a telephone booth. And, believe me, Wolfe would never have fit on a seat that small nor could he even fit into a telephone booth. Rex Stout created the character to be portly and referred to in the novels as weighing almost a quarter of a ton. That’s not even close to how much a Quick-Seat Chair can hold, including “the 800-pound gorilla” in the room that no one wants to talk about. Quick-Seat Chairs are rated to hold up to 1000 pounds, but please don’t tell Nero Wolfe or he won’t even begin to watch his weight.

Fer-de-Lance (Nero Wolfe, #1) by Rex Stout

In Rex Stout‘s fictional Nero Wolfe world, Wolfe needed a conveyance for getting from his first floor office to the rooftop to tend his orchids, which he did every day at 11 A.M. sharp. But, Rex Stout was smart enough to know that Wolfe would not be able to traverse those flights of stairs, so an elevator had to be introduced into the stories and Wolfe’s was a beauty. The gilded and ornate Otis Elevator would swiftly whisk him away the minute the doors closed. There was only one snag. No place to sit. And only one question. What would Wolfe do if the power in New York went out leaving him in the elevator to wait?

The answer is that he would have to wait for eight decades before a seat was invented that wouldn’t take up precious space in the elevator, one that would hold his ample proportions, and one that could be custom matched to the décor to please Wolfe’s eye for elegance. And let’s not forget that Wolfe, whose only exercise was opening up his own six bottles of beer each night, single-handedly, was not going to want to fiddle around trying to get a seat to open.  Quick-Seat Chair could have met all of the great detective’s needs if it had been around back then, and it can answer all of your needs today for anyplace that needs a seat when the need to sit occurs. You never have to fiddle around with a Quick-Seat Chair. It opens easily and closes itself gracefully like the end of a good ballet. If Quick-Seat Chair was available back in 1934 or even when the last novel was written in 1975, you can be sure that Rex Stout would never have left it out of Wolfe’s elevator.

So why not ask for a Quick-Seat in your building’s elevator today?

Quick-Seat Chair. Temporary Seating That Closes Itself.